ON TRUTH AND LIES IN A NONMORAL SENSE PDF

adminComment(0)

Friedrich Nietzsche - On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral. Sense. Once upon a time, in some out of the way corner of that universe which is dispersed. On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense (). 1. By Friedrich Nietzsche. 2. Once upon a time, in some out of the way corner of that universe which is dispersed. On Truth and Lie in an Extra-Moral Sense. Frederich Nietzsche. 1. In some remote corner of the universe, poured out and glittering in innumerable solar systems.


On Truth And Lies In A Nonmoral Sense Pdf

Author:LAWANNA HESSMAN
Language:English, German, Japanese
Country:Monaco
Genre:Fiction & Literature
Pages:186
Published (Last):02.10.2015
ISBN:300-4-19825-901-9
ePub File Size:18.71 MB
PDF File Size:14.45 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Sign up for free]
Downloads:44555
Uploaded by: ELISE

On Truth and Lying in a Non-Moral Sense of the will in one. But when it is spoken , i.e. with the symbolism of sound, its effect is incomparably more powerful and. In some remote corner of the universe, poured out and glittering in innumerable solar systems, there once was a star on which clever animals invented. Nietzsche's Rhetoric and Man's Worn Out Coins “On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense” was written in by German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche.

But then what it is that strive him to search for truth? It is the need to be accepted socially. This peace treaty brings in its wake something which appears to be the first step toward acquiring that puzzling truth drive: to wit, that which shall count as "truth" from now on is established.

That is to say, a uniformly valid and binding designation is invented for things, and this legislation of language likewise establishes the first laws of truth. For the contrast between truth and lie arises here for the first time.

He is indifferent toward pure knowledge which has no consequences; toward those truths which are possibly harmful and destructive he is even hostilely inclined. And besides, what about these linguistic conventions themselves? Are they perhaps products of knowledge, that is, of the sense of truth?

Related titles

Are designations congruent with things? Is language the adequate expression of all realities? The name of a word causes a nerve stimulation which is transferred into a metaphor image and then the image is imitated in second metaphor sound.

You might also like: PDF SANDRA BROWN INDONESIA

The inferences from words, according to Nietzsche, further, is a result of false application and not of truth for if we cared much for truth then there would have been decisive standpoints of certainty instead of subjective stimulation. What I find noteworthy here is that since we are aware of objects and their inferences which we gather thereof, as a result of our exposure to them as being concepts which are long held in relation to us or things around, it is difficult for us to think of them as not congruent designations.

We know nothing whatsoever about an essential quality called "honesty"; but we do know of countless individualized and consequently unequal actions which we equate by omitting the aspects in which they are unequal and which we now designate as "honest" actions. Gilman, Carole Blair, David J. Friedrich Nietzsche on rhetoric and language: Parent, p. Includes indexes.

Languages— Philosophy. Gilman, Sander L. Blair, Carole. Parent, David J. F69 dcl9 Printed in the United States of America on acid-free paper Preface The first publication of Friedrich Nietzsche's complete lectures on rhetoric was made possible only with the cooperation of the Goethe- Schiller Archive of the National Research and Museum Organiza- tion of Classical German Literature, Weimar, and its director Karl- Heinz Hahn, who made the manuscripts available. We are also grate- ful for the new critical edition of Nietzsche's work edited by the late Mazzino Montinari and the late Giorgio Colli.

The volume was edited by Sander L. The introduction was written by Carole Blair and Sander L. The first section of the English translation of the lectures on rhetoric was done by Car- ole Blair and published in the journal Philosophy and Rhetoric. We are grateful to the editor of that journal, Professor Donald Verene, for his permission to republish the translation.

The establishment of the entire German text was undertaken by Sander L. Gilman and David J. The second half of the translation of the lectures, as well as the translations of the texts in Part II, was done by David J. The checking of the Greek texts was ably done by Fredericke Hohendahl. Ithaca, New York July S.

On Truth And Lie In A Nonmoral Sense

That was the most arrogant and the most untruthful moment in "world history" — yet indeed only a moment. After nature had taken a few breaths, the star froze over and the clever animals had to die. Someone could invent such a fable and still not have illustrated adequately how pitiful, how shadowy and fleeting, how purposeless and arbitrary the human intellect appears within nature. There were eternities when it did not exist; and someday when it no longer is there, not much will have changed.

For that intellect has no further mission leading beyond human life. It is utterly human, and only its owner and producer takes it with such pathos as if the whole world hinged upon it. But if we could communicate with the gnat, we would leam that it too swims through the air with this same pathos and feels within itself the flying center of this world. Nothing in nature is so contemptible and insignificant that it would not imme- diately be swollen up like a balloon by the slightest touch of that power of knowledge; and just as every cargo-carrier wants to have his admirer, so too the proudest man of all, the philosopher, believes he sees the eyes of the universe focused telescopically from all direc- tions upon his- actions and thoughts.

It is remarkable that the intellect manages to do this, for in reality this faculty is given only as a help to the most unfortunate, most delicate, and most perishable creature, in order to preserve it for a moment in an existence out of which it would otherwise, like Less- ing's son, have every reason to flee. Its most universal effect is deception— but even its most specific effects have something of this same deceptiveness. The intellect, as a means of preserving the individual, develops its ON TRUTH AND LYING main powers in dissimulation; for this is the means by which the weaker, less robust individuals survive, since in the struggle for exis- tence they are denied the horns and the sharp teeth of beasts of prey.

This art of dissimulation reaches its peak in man; here deception, flattery, lying and cheating, slander, false pretenses, living on bor- rowed glory, masquerading, conventions of concealment, playacting before others and before oneself, in sum, the constant fluttering about the flame of vanity, is so much the rule and the law that almost nothing is more incomprehensible than how an honest and pure desire for truth could arise among men.

They are deeply immersed in delusions and phantasmagoria; their eye merely glides around the surface of things and sees "forms"; their perception leads nowhere to the truth, but is satisfied with receiving stimuli and, as it were, play- ing a groping game on the back of things. Moreover, at night, for a whole life long, man lets himself be lied to in dreams, and his moral feeling does not seek to prevent this, although there are said to be men who can overcome snoring by sheer willpower.

For what does man really know about himself! If only he could ever see himself perfectly, as if displayed in an illuminated showcase! Does not nature keep nearly everything secret from him, even about his own body, in order to hold him fast under the spell of a proud, delusionary con- sciousness, unmindful of the windings of his entrails, the swift flow of his bloodstream, the intricate quiverings of his tissues! She threw away the key; and woe to the fateful curiosity that ever succeeded in peering through a crack out of the room of consciousness and down- ward, suddenly realizing that man is based on a lack of mercy, insa- tiable greed, murder, on the indifference that stems from ignorance, as it were clinging to a tiger's back in dreams.

Given this state of affairs, where in the world does the desire for truth originate? Since the individual wants to preserve himself against other indi- viduals, in the natural state man uses the intellect mostly for dissi- mulation.

But at the same time, because man, out of necessity and boredom, wants to live socially in the herd, he needs a peace agree- ment, and he tries to eliminate at least the crudest forms of the hel- ium omnium contra omnes [war of all against all].

For what "truth" will be from now on is fixed; a uniformly valid and binding terminology for things is invented and the legislation of language also enacts the first laws of truth. The liar uses the valid terms, the words, to make the unreal appear real; for instance, he says, "I am rich," when "poor" would be the right term. He misuses established conventions by arbi- trary substitutions and even reversals of names.

When he does this in a selfish and damaging manner, society will no longer trust him and so it will exclude him from its presence. But men flee not so much being deceived as being harmed by deceit.

What they hate is really not so much deception as the bad, hostile consequences of cer- tain kinds of deceptions. Man also wants truth in a similar, restricted sense.

On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense

He longs for the pleasant, life-preserving consequences of truth; he is indifferent to pure, inconsequential knowledge; toward truths which are perhaps even damaging and destructive, he is hos- tile.

And furthermore, what is the situation with those conventions of language? Are they perhaps products of knowledge, of the sense for truth? Do terms coincide with things? Is language the adequate expression of all realities?

Only by forgetfulness can man ever come to believe that he has truth to the above-designated degree. Unless he wants to settle for truth in the form of tautology, i.

Recent Posts

What is a word? Friedrich Nietzsche Search for more papers by this author. Book Editor s: David Wood Search for more papers by this author. First published: Tools Request permission Export citation Add to favorites Track citation. Share Give access Share full text access. Share full text access. Please review our Terms and Conditions of Use and check box below to share full-text version of article.

Summary This chapter contains section titled: Citing Literature Number of times cited according to CrossRef:Does not nature keep nearly everything secret from him, even about his own body, in order to hold him fast under the spell of a proud, delusionary con- sciousness, unmindful of the windings of his entrails, the swift flow of his bloodstream, the intricate quiverings of his tissues!

The establishment of the entire German text was undertaken by Sander L. People tend to recoil when called a liar. We are grateful to the editor of that journal, Professor Donald Verene, for his permission to republish the translation. The word "appearance" contains many seductions; and so I avoid it as much as possible.

People tend to recoil when called a liar. Every concept originates by the equation of the dissimilar. Most things in nature we are not even aware of so how can we perceive ourselves.

That enormous structure of beams and boards of the concepts, to which the poor man clings for dear life, is for the liberated intellect just a scaffolding and plaything for his boldest artifices. When we speak of trees, colors, snow, and flowers, we believe we know something about the things themselves, although what we have are just metaphors of things, which do not correspond at all to the original entities.